Amanda Knox: On trial in Italy and in the public eye

Amanda Knox is in the process of appealing her 2009 conviction of killing her British roomate, Meredith Kercher along with then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito.

48 Hours Mystery did a fantastic story on the case, and can be found here.

The prosecutors say Knox an her boyfriend killed the girl in a drug-induced sex game gone wrong. The defense says there’s no DNA evidence to prove such a thing.

Not to mention Rudy Guede, an Ivory Coast native whose DNA was found on Kercher. The day after the murder he fled Italy and was arrested in Germany.

Knox and Sollecito were questioned by Italian police for hours–all day and night. Throughout the course of the interrogation, Knox claims she signed a statement saying she took part in the killing because of exhaustion and police pressure, while Italian police deny the girl was ever pressured to do anything.

Knox is serving a 26 year sentence, while her boyfriend is serving 25 years. Both of those convictions are under appeal.

Rudy Guede is serving a 16-year sentence, as part of a plea deal. Basically, he admitted Knox and Sollecito’s participation in the murder and received a lesser sentence.

The latest news in this case is a new Lifetime movie that portrays the story of Amanda Knox. It is called Amanda Knox: Murder on Trial in Italy. Lawyers for both Knox and Sollecito have threatened to sue Lifetime for the movie, and neither the families of Knox or Meredith Kercher are pleased about the film.

The dramatized film apparently portrays scenes between Knox (Played by Hayden Panettiere) and Sollecito in bed, as well as a murder scene which has been removed based on complaints coming from Knox and Kercher’s families.

While Knox’s trial is in under the appeals process, the world will wait for a verdict. Still, despite what the verdict says and has said in the past, the public will continue to share their opinions on Knox’s guilt or innocence. And in the midst of it all, a new film risks a whole new portrayal and even more influence.

Should Lifetime pull the movie out of respect for the victim and due to the fact the conviction is under appeal? It’s a question that is ever so present as we await fate.

If the prosecution gets their way, Knox gets life. If the defense gets their way, Knox gets a new trial. Furthermore and appeal could be denied.

What do you think?

Sidenote: I obtained the facts about the case from various sources from everywhere, including the 48 hours mystery episode and numerous articles that have been published on the case. They were obtained through Google and include CBS News and Lifetime.

Advertisements

6 comments

  1. Actually, her questioning that night wasn’t “all day and all night.” It was sollecito who was called in, and Knox went along with him and was initially hanging out in the police station. Questioning of her that night didn’t start until 10pm. Her first statement came just four hours later, at 1:45 am- but that one was not usable in court against her.

    It is the american press that has been prejudiced -for- knox and has failed in reporting accurately. The italian press was far less then what the americans make it out to be. For instance- it was Nick Pisa’s articles in the UK (daily mail) that harped on knox’s nickname of “foxy knoxy”, -not- the italian press.

  2. No matter whether the bias in any country is pro- or anti-, I tihnk that making a movie (particularly a Lifetime movie) about this case before it is entirely resolved is pretty questionable, all things considered.

  3. Another thing that I was shocked to read is that Lifetime included a graphic murder scene, which neither the victim nor Knox’s families were OK with. Lifetime eventually cut it.

    Also, many articles/families of Knox and Kercher are saying the movie is filled with inaccuracies. A particularly shocking thing is that Lifetime shows the victim being attacked in her underwear, when the truth of the matter is she was clothed at the time of the attack. It’s something that I think is kind of offensive to the family, let alone something that could have an effect on the trial.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s